Modern home design - decor ideas: Australia
Showing posts with label Australia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Australia. Show all posts

House 3 - Contemporary House with Wooden Facade in Victoria

Wednesday, June 03, 2015
House 3 - Contemporary House with Wooden Facade in Victoria
House 3 - Contemporary House with Wooden Facade in Victoria
Coy Yiontis Architects again creates the work of architecture in the form of a single family house located in a heritage streetscape one of Balaclava, Victoria, Australia.

Artistic Shipping Container Home in Brisbane

Saturday, December 20, 2014
Artistic Shipping Container Home in Brisbane
 Artistic Shipping Container Home in Brisbane
This artistic shipping container home was designed by Todd Miller from Ziegler Build, made up of 31 measuring 20 foot shipping containers.

Located in Jaora Street, Graceville, Brisbane, Qld, Australia, this spacious three story house in the area of 706 square maters and the house of 506 square meters.

31 Shipping Container Home broker’s description:
“It’s not often that a home of this calibre comes onto the market.
Welcome to the largest shipping container house of its kind in Australia. Sprawling over three levels, built from 31 shipping containers and demonstrating superior fit and finish in every aspect of its unique design, it is a significant residential offering the likes of which will not be found anywhere else.
Immaculate presentation defines this architectural home.
Encompassing three generous levels, it sees a return to the power of classic design elements: clean lines, open spaces and quality finishes. Seamless living areas span across the first floor, merging together without interruption. Cleverly designed to incorporate interesting angles, soaring voids and artistic features, these abundant living spaces are both practical and visually engaging.
Rich interiors details emphasize natural elegance, showcasing a dynamic mixture of materials while an abundant use of glass maximizes natural light throughout and encourages uninterrupted visual connections with the river and leafy surrounds.
The transition between indoors and out was paramount in the design of this home as evidenced by the numerous outdoor spaces featured on each level.
Purpose built for relaxing and entertaining, these outdoor spaces open the home up to cooling breezes while creating a relaxed and balanced floor plan that makes the most of the tropical Queensland climate.
There are four bedrooms positioned over two levels, offering the space and privacy to accommodate the growing family.
Three are positioned together on the first floor while the master encompasses the entire upper level.
The ultimate parent’s retreat, it is further enhanced by extensive walk-in robes and a lavish private ensuite complete with tiled mural.
It’s the fastidious attention to detail that really sets this home apart.
Evident in every aspect of the design, it not only ensures quality family living but provides delightful surprises and clever inclusions around every corner.
From the mezzanine reading room to the pull out queen wall bed in the rumpus room, this home surpasses your every expectation.
Other exceptional features include a study, art study/home office, workshop, gym space and sparkling saltwater pool.
The home also offers a 3000L water tank, satellite wiring and is solar ready.
Situated on 706m2 in tranquil Graceville with river views, the convenience of this home nearly surpasses its individual beauty.
A number of local shops and restaurants are located nearby as are schools, public transport and parklands, offering that well-balanced family lifestyle.
Additionally, the CBD is a mere 8kms away for quick and easy access to all that Brisbane has to offer.”

More inspirational shipping container homes


Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia

Wednesday, November 06, 2013
Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia
Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia
A Sustainable Residence has designed mainly constructed of wood by Indyk Architects and is located in Coalcliff, Australia, named south coast residence.
Sustainable home design is an alternative way to make a house more friendly to the natural environment. There are many advantages people might inspire of this concept approach. Many green idea are applied into this contemporary home both active energy technologies and passive technologies. Improving the house more environmental friendly, it is also installed technologies provide energy element needs, rainwater collection, photovoltaic panels, air ventilation system might increase comfort inside. These sustainable approach is able to increase value of home which reflects awareness of occupants to environmental sustainability.
Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia

South Coast Residence by Indyk Architects:

"The house grew out of its formidable site, inspired by the Illawarra Escarpment to the far west and north, and to its east the tidal ocean rock shelf and ocean beyond. Our aim was to create a ‘safe harbour’ for living; to borrow and imbed the ocean-scape within the house views and to make a home of beauty and craftsmanship.
The clients have a love for boats, concrete and all things Japanese. Their new house reads from the street as a timber house, massed as a series of boxes in reference to the coastal shacks that previously stood in the street. The ‘mass’ speaks to adjoining neighbours in height & scale. On the interior a concrete house is revealed.
The client’s program called for a house for two people, to accommodate regular visits from grown children, grand children & elderly parents. A house, with the enjoyment of ‘making and eating food’ at its centre. A house, that would creatively display the client’s art and pottery collection. A house, that environmentally responded to its location.
The House divides into three staggered floor levels relating to the landform it sits upon, the height restrictions that protect neighbour’s views behind and its own internal views out to the ocean. The largest floor level is the ‘public’ ground floor space with cooking, eating, lounge space, guest bathroom and bedroom. There is the ‘private’ first floor mezzanine with main bedroom, bathing and study perch, that overlooks the main living space below. The level that links the house with the ocean, is the lower ground floor, with an additional guest room that doubles as a Pilates space, and a covered pottery work terrace that opens to a western terraced vegetable garden and pond, and to the eastern coastal garden and ocean.
Arrival into the house, is through the northern breezeway that links all levels of the house externally. A mosquito screened ‘lung’ of the house, it allows the inner core to open up, extending areas and views. Its recycled ‘post and beam’ Spotted gum hardwood structure, is a counterpoint to the concrete ‘post and beam’ inner structure. This system allows great flexibility between inside and outside and between internal spaces.
The house site has its long section facing north, stimulating an architectural response of ‘partnered’ indoor-outdoor rooms. At main ground floor level, the kitchen opens to a sheltered central courtyard, which then connects to a terraced vegetable herb garden facing north east, protected from southerly winds. The lounge area, four steps above the ground floor level, opens to its north, into a large roofed porch that can house 20 people around a family table. This porch has a northern coastal view of disappearing headlands and a panoramic ocean horizon view to the east, and looking downwards a spectacular detailed view of the rock platform below.
In this house the landscape, environmental, structural and lighting disciplines were critically linked. A work of architecture must integrate disciplines to create a crafted whole.

SUSTAINABILITY
The Coalciff house was designed to meet a sustainable outcome. It is thermally appropriate, well sealed from Southerly winds, able to recycle its collected rainwater, and to generate a base module of electricity. The clients’ commitment to sustainability included the installation of 6KW photovoltaic cells, equivalent to a third of the clients usage. The electricity generated is circulated into the grid. Solar heating with gas boosting provides for the hot water supply. Glazing is a mixture of double glazed and Low E glazing solutions. Rainwater is collected and stored at basement level in a 7500lt tank, and recycled to serve all toilet cisterns and garden irrigation.
The house is a post and beam structure of concrete internally and externally of recycled hardwood. Its southern elevation is of concrete block, with cavity and internal concrete wall panels. Its west and northern elevations are reverse block veneer.
Concrete internal walls allow for additional thermal mass and create the neutral background for display of the client’s art collection. The external recycled Spotted gum cladding creates a link to the coastal house detailing of the past and present.
The structural floors are 40mpa concrete and work as a thermal mass absorbing eastern and northern sunshine that penetrates the interior. The ‘lung’ of the house, which also links externally the levels of the house, is a northern breezeway screen structure, allowing cross ventilation through a screened façade. Additional cross ventilation occurs east and west with high level louvres, circulating the warm air at ceiling level.
The architectural language of an exposed structural system with a restrained palette of materials has created a more singular approach to materials and a limited radius of sourcing. Concrete and concrete blocks were sourced locally. Recycled timber has been delivered from the north coast while all joinery was made locally."

Waverley Residence, Sydney

Sunday, October 06, 2013
Waverley Residence, Sydney
Waverley Residence, Sydney
Energy is important key that must be an object interested in concept and designing a house, not only elegance and good looking but also health - such as air flow, light supply - ought to effect its own comfort. Anderson Architecture has designed Waverley Residence where is laid in Waverley, a suburb region of Sydney, Australia. This contemporary house design determines and applies the house energy needs, one of them is passive solar using. See inside the house, the elegant modern interior is arranged and combined to passive solar technique, ant thermal modeling.
Waverley Residence by Anderson Architecture:
“This project is our most thermally efficient house to date, developed through the use of in house computerized thermal modeling.

The house requires very little heating or cooling, utilizing passive solar techniques, internal thermal mass and natural ventilation to maintain a comfortable, healthy indoor environment.

A challenging aspect, with excessive western exposure and a large existing building to the north, helped define the lofty roof forms which capture northern light.
A run down weatherboard house in Waverley, with a large neighbour immediately to the north, seems an unlikely starting point for contemporary family home featuring exemplar environmental credentials. This however was the brief from the clients who requested a warm and modern 4 bedroom house with a strong connection to the outdoors and minimal reliance on artificial heating, cooling and lighting.
The project was conceived from the outset with sustainability at the core of the design, despite site restrictions which encouraged creative solutions to meet performance goals. Natural materials and finishes feature extensively to balance and harmonise with the technical and mineral elements required by contemporary standards for a completely modern and integrated sustainable design outcome.
Extensive computer modelling was used to confirm principles and develop the passive solar design, resulting in an 8 star certification. This modelling highlighted the limitations imposed by a 3 storey northern neighbour on passive solar potential, and led to a C-Bus controlled active design, featuring operable shading, ventilation, day-lighting and heating/cooling elements regulated by numerous internal and external temperature, rain, light and wind sensors.
A holistic approach integrated elements such as external shading, operable roof, thermal mass/structural walls, exposed concrete floor, natural materials and shade planting into the overall design concept resulting in many items performing multiple tasks to further reduce total material consumption while reinforcing design principles.
Rainwater storage, onsite stormwater detention and near complete site permeability greatly reduced the properties impact on the natural hydrological cycle while supplying the house with much of its water needs. Self sufficiency is enhanced with an inbuilt capacity for grid connected solar PV array and a solar water heating system for domestic water supply and hydronic floor heating.
The end result showcases innovative uses of materials, products and technologies to meet an ambitious design brief and provide an exemplary sustainable residential dwelling, built using a philosophy of passive and active design theory which borrows heavily from both traditional and contemporary technological principles, expanding the potential of existing sites and the future of sustainability in residential architecture.”
Photos by: Nick Bowers
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