Modern home design - decor ideas: Bathroom Design
Showing posts with label Bathroom Design. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bathroom Design. Show all posts

Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof

Saturday, September 06, 2014
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof
Green roof can beautify a house, it may be a solution to make healthy environment around us.
Many sources of green roof idea you could ever get, both architects, green roof installation services and parks, as well as inspiration from information in the form of articles and photographs of green roof ideas through the internet, classic to stylish home furnishings. Unity between garden, home design, green roof, and home interior can add value of comfort.
This is a contemporary house decorated with futuristic green roof are served by a-dlab from Singapore in 2013 and named Andrew Road. The house located in Singapore designed on unique garden in the form of slopping green roof, vertical garden, and the plants hanging down on one side of the upper level. This contemporary home able to reduce and reflect sound coming from street so it would give relax and privacy.

Photographs by Derek Swalwell
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Sloping Green Roof and Pool on a storey below the street level
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof slopping landscape


Andrew Road by a-dlab:

Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green RoofSingapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof“Situated in the well-known Caldecott region of central Singapore, this bungalow by A D Lab enjoys the relaxed atmosphere of its quaint residential neighbourhood with gorgeous views of the MacRitchie Reservoir, one of the nation’s most popular nature reserves. The architects, however, had to contend with the site’s proximity to a busy highway, that although is not visible from the site, creates a significant amount of noise. The undulating terrain of the neighbourhood is quite unusual in Singapore, and creates a streetscape whereby the plots of land are about a storey below the street level. As such, each house along the street is entered from the second storey level. The architects took advantage of this unusual situation to lower most of the communal facilities down into a sunken court that shields them from the noise of the highway, as well as heightens the level of privacy and intimacy of the house.
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green RoofFrom the external entrance of the house, the architectural expression is very understated. The architects kept the built form above street level as ground-hugging as possible by making the roofs appear as folds and peels in the landscape. This understated expression is further assisted by the folding of the roof downward toward the outer edges of the house. The internal spatial expression of this tilting roof form gives the opposite experience, whereby the entrance to the spaces are low and rise upward from the entry, creating the sensation of an enlarging, grand internal room that simultaneously leads the eyes upward to the sky, as well as downward to the intimate central courtyard below. The undulating and folding roof form is covered in turf, further defining it as a continuation of the surrounding green landscape. At certain locations, the roof folds up from the earth level to allow wind and light into the sunken courtyard.
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof
In another move to increase privacy, A D Lab encircles the main rooms at all levels with circulation space that acts as noise buffers. The corridors and staircases wrap around the outer perimeter of the house, focusing the view from the rooms towards the central courtyard, as well as creating a sense of drama about the movement of a person through the house. The “viewer” moves through the house via these corridors that are at times hidden hallways behind the rooms and at other times open out to theatrical balcony-like spaces that view down to the garden and main living spaces.
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green Roof
Singapore Contemporary House with Futuristic Green RoofThe owner lives in this house with his parents, so this network of hidden and detached corridors allows the inhabitants the flexibility of moving around the house either subtly or in full view depending on the varying social situation and need for privacy. The central courtyard is a private and serene oasis. A luxurious swimming pool cools the courtyard along with a series of indoor and outdoor water features that separate the main public rooms from each other and bring the pool element into the house itself.”
Singapore Contemporary House luxurious central pool
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - a striking red color seat
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - beautiful color combination of chair, stairs, floor, wall, and landscape
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - bright stone accent in the kitchen and dark combination
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - bright landscape and dark meeting / dining set combinationSingapore Contemporary House - interior design - lounge deisgn
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - slopping wall and stairs with natural light coming from large glass wall
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - luxurious white bathroom furniture and dark floor with natural lightSingapore Contemporary House - interior design - luxurious white bathroom furniture and dark floor with natural light
Singapore Contemporary House - interior design - luxurious white bathroom furniture and dark floor with natural light

LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

Monday, January 13, 2014
LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

LEED House “Like A Houseboat”
Shipley Architects has created completely a sustainable house in 2008, it is called "like a houseboat".
This contemporary house was named that because of this house is floated above poor soil on steel beams. LEED Platinum was received "like a houseboat". Many kind of home technologies feature this house more eco-friendly and might able adapt with the natural environment such as geothermal heating and cooling system, reusing wood planks.

Architects: Shipley Architects
Location: Dallas, Texas, USA
Architect In Charge: Dan Shipley
Builder: Rick Fontenot of Constructive General Contractors
Client: Rick & Julie Fontenot
Area: 1,490 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Charles Davis Smith

Like a Houseboat by Shipley Architects:


“Based on location alone, this 1,490-square-foot house takes significant steps toward a reduced carbon footprint. It’s part of Urban Reserve, a development of modern residences in Dallas that sits near a light-rail station and a hiking and biking trail. Along with this proximity to green transportation options, the zero-lot-line community encourages space- efficient house designs. “Just the way it’s planned automatically puts Urban Reserve into a more sustainable category,” says Dan Shipley, FAIA, principal of Dallas-based Shipley Architects.

But he and the homeowners took the project much further into green territory, ultimately achieving LEED Platinum status. The clients “did all the LEED paperwork,” Shipley confides. “That allowed us to concentrate on designing the house.”

One of their biggest challenges was the site’s poor soil quality. The property was once a landfill, and its weak, expansive soil has a low bearing capacity. But Shipley and his staff came up with a creative, cost-effective solution: They floated the house above the earth on steel beams supported by concrete piers. This siting method upped the home’s green quotient, due to its minimal disturbance of the land. The design team even managed to incorporate salvaged wood—2-inch-by-12-inch planks from the dance floor at the clients’ wedding—into the main floor frame.

A geothermal system heats and cools the house, as is the case in many of the firm’s recent projects. “We’ve been doing geothermal a lot lately,” Shipley says. “People like the idea of it. It uses natural means for the heat exchange, and it gets rid of awkward, clumsy condensing units.” Pressure-treated wood that typically would be used for porch flooring makes an unconventional siding material. “It just goes up quickly,” he notes. And a ramp of metal grating creates a more substantial entry passage into the 20-foot-wide home. “In small houses, the question is always, How do you have a sense of arrival and movement?” he says. “Once you do go in the front door, you’re right there at the kitchen island. The ramp was a way of leveraging or extending the sense of arrival.” The gang-plank-like ramp, along with the home’s compact, floating nature, inspired the nickname “Like a Houseboat."
garage contemporary home like houseboat

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corridor LEED House “Like A Houseboat”wood LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

simple furniture LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

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unique stairs LEED House “Like A Houseboat”wood stairs ideas LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

simple bedroom design LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

minimalist sliding door LEED House “Like A Houseboat”white bathroom design LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

wood metal home LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

unique wood LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios

Monday, October 07, 2013
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Superuse Studios design the atractive contemporary house, its named Villa Welpeloo which a couple has a enxiety for art in Netherlands. This artistic house is composed up of many kind of unused materials. Recycle something not used could bautify this house while reducing the environmental polution.

Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios:

Villa Welpeloo is a residence for a couple with the exquisite wish to store and show a collection of paintings and graphical work of young contemporary artists.
2012Architecten aspired to use as much surplus materials as possible. Scouts have (re)searched the possibilities and availability of surplus materials in the vicinity of the site during the design phase. Based on the findings there was a continuous stream of new incentives to develop the design further. The found materials resulted in new shapes and new ways of construction. For the facade the inner parts of a cable reels are
used. The load bearing construction is made from steel beams from a paternoster (textile factory machine).
Interior
The basics of the interior are shaped by the exhibition space where paintings can be shown.To make the paintings stand out the colours and
materials of the interior are on the background.Besides that all the electrical wiring for appliances and lighting has been hidden inside the walls. All built in furniture has a vertical calibration that is used playfully and expressive to place various functions within the furniture. The stair and the furnishings have the same reticent set of colours. On the inside of the furnishings the noteworthy materialization of building signage as drawers and cupboards appears. An elevator for the transport of goods is incorporated in the studio and hidden from sight; it is the building elevator that was used during the construction of the steel frame. The art works are lit by remarkable armatures made from the stretchers of broken umbrellas. It is designed for this villa by studio En-Fer.
Materials
The waste materials provided a continuous stream of new incentives to develop and refine the design. New shapes and innovative construction methods were needed to incorporate the found materials.
Construction
The main structure is made out of steel profiles that previously made up a machine for textile production, an industry once very important in the region. One of these machines gave us enough steel to construct the whole villa.
Facades
The main facades are built with wood normally used for particleboard or for burning. TKF, a factory which produces cables, has large numbers of redundant cable reels, too damaged for further original use. The wooden slats which make up the core of these reels are generally undamaged and of a standard size. These slats, collected from a thousand reels, provided enough material for the facade.
Photos by: Allard van der Hoek
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse StudiosVilla Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse StudiosVilla Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse StudiosVilla Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse StudiosVilla Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios
Villa Welpeloo by Superuse Studios