Modern home design - decor ideas: Passive Energy
Showing posts with label Passive Energy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Passive Energy. Show all posts

Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects

Sunday, January 26, 2014
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz ArchitectsContemporary home is equipped with the ability to adapt to the environment have been completed by Guz Architects.
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects, this house built to attract fresh experience for living and can be used as an example or idea of an environmentally friendly home inspiration. Simple application of innovation, such as the implementing of passive energy, is very useful for the sake of convenience. In my opinion, Guz Architects has always designed inspirational homes, absolutely environmentally friendly homes design that you can see the tag of Guz Architects. Pictures bellow courtesy of Guz Architects represent the amazing sustainable work or Rattan House.

Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects:

“The rattan house was conceived to make the most of what is a relatively condensed site in Singapore’s “good class bungalow” district; with buildings all around and little breeze. The L-shaped plan was designed to make the most of the views and funnel the breezes throughout the house.Within this we tried to create gardens and green areas to not only passively cool the house, but also to provide greenery and a sense of space which all occupants could share. The house was completed on a very low budget (for Singapore) of less than S$1m.Rattan screens were used along the main entrance hall of the house to provide privacy, yet still allow the air to flow through.”

Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects

Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects

Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz ArchitectsRattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz ArchitectsRattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects
Rattan House in Singapore by Guz Architects

Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia

Wednesday, November 06, 2013
Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia
Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia
A Sustainable Residence has designed mainly constructed of wood by Indyk Architects and is located in Coalcliff, Australia, named south coast residence.
Sustainable home design is an alternative way to make a house more friendly to the natural environment. There are many advantages people might inspire of this concept approach. Many green idea are applied into this contemporary home both active energy technologies and passive technologies. Improving the house more environmental friendly, it is also installed technologies provide energy element needs, rainwater collection, photovoltaic panels, air ventilation system might increase comfort inside. These sustainable approach is able to increase value of home which reflects awareness of occupants to environmental sustainability.
Sustainable Residence, South Coast In Australia

South Coast Residence by Indyk Architects:

"The house grew out of its formidable site, inspired by the Illawarra Escarpment to the far west and north, and to its east the tidal ocean rock shelf and ocean beyond. Our aim was to create a ‘safe harbour’ for living; to borrow and imbed the ocean-scape within the house views and to make a home of beauty and craftsmanship.
The clients have a love for boats, concrete and all things Japanese. Their new house reads from the street as a timber house, massed as a series of boxes in reference to the coastal shacks that previously stood in the street. The ‘mass’ speaks to adjoining neighbours in height & scale. On the interior a concrete house is revealed.
The client’s program called for a house for two people, to accommodate regular visits from grown children, grand children & elderly parents. A house, with the enjoyment of ‘making and eating food’ at its centre. A house, that would creatively display the client’s art and pottery collection. A house, that environmentally responded to its location.
The House divides into three staggered floor levels relating to the landform it sits upon, the height restrictions that protect neighbour’s views behind and its own internal views out to the ocean. The largest floor level is the ‘public’ ground floor space with cooking, eating, lounge space, guest bathroom and bedroom. There is the ‘private’ first floor mezzanine with main bedroom, bathing and study perch, that overlooks the main living space below. The level that links the house with the ocean, is the lower ground floor, with an additional guest room that doubles as a Pilates space, and a covered pottery work terrace that opens to a western terraced vegetable garden and pond, and to the eastern coastal garden and ocean.
Arrival into the house, is through the northern breezeway that links all levels of the house externally. A mosquito screened ‘lung’ of the house, it allows the inner core to open up, extending areas and views. Its recycled ‘post and beam’ Spotted gum hardwood structure, is a counterpoint to the concrete ‘post and beam’ inner structure. This system allows great flexibility between inside and outside and between internal spaces.
The house site has its long section facing north, stimulating an architectural response of ‘partnered’ indoor-outdoor rooms. At main ground floor level, the kitchen opens to a sheltered central courtyard, which then connects to a terraced vegetable herb garden facing north east, protected from southerly winds. The lounge area, four steps above the ground floor level, opens to its north, into a large roofed porch that can house 20 people around a family table. This porch has a northern coastal view of disappearing headlands and a panoramic ocean horizon view to the east, and looking downwards a spectacular detailed view of the rock platform below.
In this house the landscape, environmental, structural and lighting disciplines were critically linked. A work of architecture must integrate disciplines to create a crafted whole.

SUSTAINABILITY
The Coalciff house was designed to meet a sustainable outcome. It is thermally appropriate, well sealed from Southerly winds, able to recycle its collected rainwater, and to generate a base module of electricity. The clients’ commitment to sustainability included the installation of 6KW photovoltaic cells, equivalent to a third of the clients usage. The electricity generated is circulated into the grid. Solar heating with gas boosting provides for the hot water supply. Glazing is a mixture of double glazed and Low E glazing solutions. Rainwater is collected and stored at basement level in a 7500lt tank, and recycled to serve all toilet cisterns and garden irrigation.
The house is a post and beam structure of concrete internally and externally of recycled hardwood. Its southern elevation is of concrete block, with cavity and internal concrete wall panels. Its west and northern elevations are reverse block veneer.
Concrete internal walls allow for additional thermal mass and create the neutral background for display of the client’s art collection. The external recycled Spotted gum cladding creates a link to the coastal house detailing of the past and present.
The structural floors are 40mpa concrete and work as a thermal mass absorbing eastern and northern sunshine that penetrates the interior. The ‘lung’ of the house, which also links externally the levels of the house, is a northern breezeway screen structure, allowing cross ventilation through a screened façade. Additional cross ventilation occurs east and west with high level louvres, circulating the warm air at ceiling level.
The architectural language of an exposed structural system with a restrained palette of materials has created a more singular approach to materials and a limited radius of sourcing. Concrete and concrete blocks were sourced locally. Recycled timber has been delivered from the north coast while all joinery was made locally."

LM Guest House by Desai Chia Architecture

Monday, November 04, 2013
LM Guest House by Desai Chia Architecture
New York Home Architecture Idea
2012 in Dutchess Country of New York, USA, an architectural firm Desai Chia Architecture designed LM Guest House implemented.
This contemporary house is primarily influenced with modern style, mainly constructed to rectangular shape. It is applied to home facade and also combined match the interior of this guest house. Many kind of passive technologies support this energy needs, solar, geothermal, and rain water collector system.

Architects: DesaiChia Architecture
Location: Dutchess County, New York, USA
Area: 2,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Paul Warchol
Structural Engineer: Ove Arup & Partners
Mechanical/Electrical/Plumbing Engineer: Tucker Associates (Salamone Group)
Geotechnical Engineer: GeoDesign
Civil Engineer: Paggi Martin DelBene
Landscape Architect: Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates
Building Envelope Consultant: James R. Gainfort AIA Consulting Architect
Lighting Consultant: Christine Sciulli Light + Design
Construction Manager: Daniel O’Connell’s Sons
sustainable home design

LM Guest House by Desai Chia Architecture:

"Located on a rolling farm property in upstate New York, the LM Guest House celebrates the beauty of the surrounding landscape sweeping views through an all-glass facade magnify the spacious, open feel of the living areas.The home employs several sustainable design strategies including geothermal heating and cooling, radiant floors, motorized solar shading, photovoltaic panels, and rainwater harvesting.

The open living and sleeping areas flow around a compact slatted wood core that disguises the mechanical, storage, and bathing spaces. Two sleeping couchettes with built-in bunk beds provide efficient accommodations for additional weekend guests. Natural white oak wood detailing provides warmth and texture throughout the home.

The high-performance glass facade was pre-fabricated off site, shipped in one container, and erected in two days. An innovative steel frame structure allows the roof to cantilever dramatically over the open living areas and bedroom."
modern home glass

modern home large glass

white wooden floor heating

wooden white bedroom design

modern bedroom design
2 bedroom terraced design

kitchen designoffice home furniture
modern home lake
large glass windowed modern home
large glass window home design
container home
Photos by: Paul Warchol

Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House

Saturday, October 26, 2013
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Castelnovo Sotto, Reggio Emilia, Italy, a contemporary house featured with sustainable technologies has been designed completely by Andrea Oliva Architetto. 
This house built in 2009 is constructed like modern house shape but there are much differences, the house adapts the environmentaly friendly complement such as passive and active technologies. Natural sun enters and makes accent of exposure into the house interior. Combination color usage of its interior both bright and dark of wall and furniture sharpen deeply its view outside and inside. There are some active energy technologies equiped and supplied for supplying the house energy, especialy exploiting the sun.

Casa Sulla Morella by Andrea Oliva Architetto:

To the borders of the country of Castelnovo Sotto, beetween the stream Morella and a roman road, in a landscape context characterized from channels, ditches, rows, shrubby stains, gardens, villas and agricultural houses it places the House on the Morella.
Inserted between rural landscape and observer to 60 mt from the road, suspended by the ground to protection of the tall stratum of superficial wather and to memory of the installations terramare, the residence is composed of two staggered elements to northeast: the porch or climatic mitigator and the housing space or insulating body.
With an orientation of 18° toward west the house exploits to the best the natural contributions that, because of the geometry of the porch, of the ample surfaces south glass door and of the flowing obscuring, they anticipate the opening to the winter sun and the protection from the afternoon summer sun.The study about the solar axonometries has allowed, therefore, to opportunely appraise the incidence of the sun on the wrap and get into proportion the fixed screenings of the vertical settis and the horizontal shutters and the mobile screenings of the flowing pannels.
The combination of some characters of the agricultural houses they are proposed through a reason euclidea, that in the key form-function, distills elements as the porta morta (passing space in the residence with scope of ventilation), the sporto di gronda (coverage's extension for protection of the vertical masonries) and the portico (integrated coverage or juxtaposed for the protection of open and external spaces of the building).
The residence has a structure in portant walls (smaller presence of thermal bridges), constituted by bricks with pores, of 38 cm, coupled to a layer of coat insulator on the external side of 10 cm, the attics are made of tiles and concrete with riddles in reinforced concrete, coibentate and separated while the coverage had a layer of 22 cm of isolation, that is coupled to a coverage mantle in corrugate iron, draining, connected to a system that pick up the rain water.
The windows are in plywood with low emissive glass and gas argon. The plant design is integrated with domotic and allows a reduction of the consumptions through the control of the temperature of the single rooms, the predisposition for an efficient job of the great electrical appliances, the automatic turning off of the lights in empty places, the checked generation of warm water for sanitaries and the regulation of the use times for each single instruments.
The heat system is constituted by radiant panels feeded by a low condensation boiler while the sanitary warm water is integrated from panels solar, places on the coverage, where an integrated photovoltaic system for 6 Kw is in progress of realization. The residence is endowed with a mechanized system for the rycircle of the air, that bring the scheduled consumption for the heating to 5,19 kWh / mq.year.
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern HouseCasa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House
Casa Sulla Morella, The Modern House