Modern home design - decor ideas: Wood Wall
Showing posts with label Wood Wall. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wood Wall. Show all posts

Contemporary Wooden House in Chile - La Dehesa

Friday, February 20, 2015
Contemporary Wooden House in Chile - La Dehesa

Contemporary House with Three Gable Roofs in Tasmania

Sunday, January 18, 2015
Contemporary House with Three Gable Roofs in Tasmania
 Contemporary House with Three Gable Roofs in Tasmania
This contemporary house was designed by Room11 and completed in 2013. Simple shaped house but unique looks like combining three houses into one.

Contemporary House Idea With Grass Roof, RD House

Saturday, August 30, 2014
Contemporary House Idea With Grass Roof, RD House
Contemporary House Idea With Grass Roof, RD House
Grass roof ideas from a contemporary house in one of a hill in Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic, designed by VASHO named RD house.
Grass roof is one alternative to decorate our house exterior or landscape to be seemed more beautiful and cool, some contemporary houses put the grass roof on flat and can be used as an outdoor space where kids play, gathering, or lounge. Besides, grass roof at the same time also has multifunction to increase the comfort of occupants inside the house stabler temperature and less sound pollution from outside. Grass roof has also been applied in various types of home-style classics to modern or contemporary. A lot of contemporary houses have been built and put grass roof on top that we can use as an additional reference to the idea of ​​applying grass roof. This is a contemporary house in the middle of forest with a grass roof on the top we can get ideas.


Photos by: Eduardo Abreu
RD House by VASHO:
Contemporary-House-Idea-plans
“The programmatic challenge: design a house that allows 18 people to fit comfortably within 500mt2 (including terraces). Open spaces, characteristic of the local architecture. All of the bedrooms have their own bathroom, study and/or library and living room-dining room-kitchen all in one space. The house will be a second home to use intermittently in the summer.
Contemporary-House-Idea-With-Grass-Roof-topThe architect recognizes that one of the greats challenges will be the difficult access and limited horizontal surface of the property, most of it having a slope of 45 to 70 degrees. That is why an extremely precise survey was made to be able to work from the foundations to the roof gardens. The natural level curve of the face of the hill influenced not only the structural reinforcement of the job but also the programmatic distribution of spaces. This can be seen, for example, in the continuity of the natural surface of the hill in the living room of the house.
Contemporary-House-Idea-With-Grass-RoofBurying the house is proposed as a visual action. Hiding the overall volume of the work to the existing natural geography to cushion the impact of the volume to the eye upon arrival, being conscientious of the paradisiacal surroundings, but always seeking to make the natural surroundings appear from the interior before the user: “Disappear to make appear”.
A large percentage of what materials of the “Habitable Refuge” is rock extracted from the excavation of the property. Its visible concrete walls were molded in pine formers which, along with the high quality native wood, delivers a rustic environment which cushions the contrast of texture-color with its surroundings without abandoning the “modern” look.
natural-jacuzzi-design-idea-wood-ceiling-and-floor
natural-kitchen-design-ideas-with-wood-stoneThe act of burying the house in the hill not only touches the esthetic aspect but also the sustainable aspect. The green roof allows for more insulation as far as direct heat from the sun is concerned. Its rear face is in contact with the rock of the hill creating a cooling phenomenon known as “thermal inertia” that consists of a basic physical action; “The temperature of a body of lesser volume equals that of a greater volume when these two bodies are in contact.” To make this possible without the constructive damages that may arise, highly engineered waterproofing methods were used. In other word the refuge does not need a mechanical cooling system. It is a contention wall in itself.
From the general understanding that where there is good administration there is energy efficiency; in other words the consumed load decreases, is that we have incorporated Domotics to the design, with the purpose to touch an ecological approach with the house. Domotic is an intelligent system that basically integrates a structured web which allows control of the lighting scene, entertainment components (sound, temperature regulation of the Jacuzzi from another location) and security (solenoid valves, cameras, alarm system, etc.) from anywhere within the home or out of the home, generating comfort and energy saving.”

LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

Monday, January 13, 2014
LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

LEED House “Like A Houseboat”
Shipley Architects has created completely a sustainable house in 2008, it is called "like a houseboat".
This contemporary house was named that because of this house is floated above poor soil on steel beams. LEED Platinum was received "like a houseboat". Many kind of home technologies feature this house more eco-friendly and might able adapt with the natural environment such as geothermal heating and cooling system, reusing wood planks.

Architects: Shipley Architects
Location: Dallas, Texas, USA
Architect In Charge: Dan Shipley
Builder: Rick Fontenot of Constructive General Contractors
Client: Rick & Julie Fontenot
Area: 1,490 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Charles Davis Smith

Like a Houseboat by Shipley Architects:


“Based on location alone, this 1,490-square-foot house takes significant steps toward a reduced carbon footprint. It’s part of Urban Reserve, a development of modern residences in Dallas that sits near a light-rail station and a hiking and biking trail. Along with this proximity to green transportation options, the zero-lot-line community encourages space- efficient house designs. “Just the way it’s planned automatically puts Urban Reserve into a more sustainable category,” says Dan Shipley, FAIA, principal of Dallas-based Shipley Architects.

But he and the homeowners took the project much further into green territory, ultimately achieving LEED Platinum status. The clients “did all the LEED paperwork,” Shipley confides. “That allowed us to concentrate on designing the house.”

One of their biggest challenges was the site’s poor soil quality. The property was once a landfill, and its weak, expansive soil has a low bearing capacity. But Shipley and his staff came up with a creative, cost-effective solution: They floated the house above the earth on steel beams supported by concrete piers. This siting method upped the home’s green quotient, due to its minimal disturbance of the land. The design team even managed to incorporate salvaged wood—2-inch-by-12-inch planks from the dance floor at the clients’ wedding—into the main floor frame.

A geothermal system heats and cools the house, as is the case in many of the firm’s recent projects. “We’ve been doing geothermal a lot lately,” Shipley says. “People like the idea of it. It uses natural means for the heat exchange, and it gets rid of awkward, clumsy condensing units.” Pressure-treated wood that typically would be used for porch flooring makes an unconventional siding material. “It just goes up quickly,” he notes. And a ramp of metal grating creates a more substantial entry passage into the 20-foot-wide home. “In small houses, the question is always, How do you have a sense of arrival and movement?” he says. “Once you do go in the front door, you’re right there at the kitchen island. The ramp was a way of leveraging or extending the sense of arrival.” The gang-plank-like ramp, along with the home’s compact, floating nature, inspired the nickname “Like a Houseboat."
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unique wood LEED House “Like A Houseboat”

Cornege-Preston House in Martinborough, New Zealand

Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Cornege-Preston House in Martinborough, New Zealand
Contemporary House in Martinborough, New Zeland
Contemporary house called Cornege Preston house has been completely designed by Bonnifait + Giesen.
This one layer house is located in Martinborough, New Zealand lays above about 2000 sq foot of wide grassy land with rural atmosphere. This contemporary house mainly constructed of concrete and wood has many feature to living from its passive energy equipment. Big water tank, solar hot water panels, and the some other features provide the home needs and independence. By entangling the sun energy, this house could minimize and depress the energy extravagance. Interesting interior also becomes the attention of the house making by combining the soft color and the natural accent of wood and other elements for its beauty. Photograph by Paul McCredle.
Cornege-Preston House in Martinborough, New Zeland

Cornege-Preston House by Bonnifait + Giesen:

“The building sits on a one-hectare site of undulating grassland in the town of Martinborough in the Wairarapa region of New Zealand. As part of the project 400 trees were planted in a grid that parallels the site’s boundaries while the 40m x 6m house is angled to follow the gentle undulations of the land. The “landscape grid” enters into the house in the form of decks/garage and courtyards which punctuate the volume. The long façade faces northwest for maximum exposure to winter afternoon sun and, consequently, best passive solar-energy gains.
The key features are:
– Concrete floor and wall construction, with a ‘heat-sink’ (Trombe) wall between the main living area and the guest rooms.
– Water heating by solar Hot water panel on roof topped up by thermostat-controlled electricity.
– Multi-zone underfloor heating (also by thermostat-controlled electricity).
– Double-glazed windows and skylights for cross-room solar penetration and heat retention, with louvres and sliding doors for natural ventilation.
– Wall and ceiling insulation of Wool.
– Seperate Guest Wing with 2 ensuited double bedrooms.
– Views to the surrounding landscape from every room.
– Sustainably harvested macracarpa pine external cladding/decking and Italian poplar ceiling linings for visual warmth and acoustic absorption.
– Two 25,000 litre tanks capturing rainwater (meaning that town supply water usage is about one third of the metered allowance).
– A separately filtered (0.5 micron) and fast-heating water supply in the kitchen.”
Modern House in Martinborough, New Zeland

Contemporary House in Martinborough, New Zeland

Modern House in New Zeland

Modern House Style in New Zeland

Green Concept Housing Idea

Natural Grass Gardening IdeaContemporary House Shape idea
  Minimalist House Idea

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Modern Small Dinning Idea

Small Modern Kitchen Idea

Light In Narrow Corridor IdeaModern Badroom Design Idea
 
Natural Light Idea

White Simple Bathroom IdeaNatural Light Bath Design